<address id="9fb5l"></address>

        . 24/7 Space News .




        Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



        OUTER PLANETS
        SwRI study describes discovery of close binary trans-Neptunian object
        by Staff Writers
        San Antonio TX (SPX) Sep 29, 2020

        This image is an artist's impression of the trans-Neptunian object that two Southwest Research Institute scientists recently discovered is a binary object.

        A new study authored by Southwest Research In-stitute scientists Rodrigo Leiva and Marc Buie reveals the binary nature of a trans-Neptunian object (TNO). Leiva and Buie utilized data obtained by the Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON), a citizen science research net-work dedicated to observing the outer solar system. The study was published this month in The Astrophysical Journal.

        Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) are small icy bodies that orbit the Sun beyond Neptune. Binary TNOs occur when two of these objects orbit each other while together orbiting the Sun. Leiva and Buie discovered two objects in a particularly close gravitational configuration.

        The pair was detected using a stellar occultation, which occurs when an object passes between Earth and a distant star which hides, or "occults," the star from view. Observers located in the path of the object's shadow can record the star blinking out and reappearing. The length of time that the object blocks the starlight can be used to determine its size.

        "In this instance, the occulted star also turned out to be a binary system. Binary stars are not unusual and binary objects are not unusual," Buie said. "But it is unusual that we had a binary TNO occulting a binary star."

        "What's also interesting and unusual is this object's characteristics," Leiva said. "The two components are quite close, only 350 kilometers apart. Most binary TNOs are very separated, usually 1,000 kilometers or more. This closeness makes this type of binary TNO difficult to detect with other methods, which is what RECON was designed to accomplish."

        The discovery of the new TNO was made possible by RECON, a collection of 56 observation stations stretching from Yuma, Arizona, to Orville, Washington. The NSF-funded project provides each station with an array of observation equipment, including 11-inch telescopes.

        High school teachers are trained by Leiva, Buie and Fiske Planetarium Director Dr. John Keller to operate the stations and observe occultations so they can then teach students how to make the same observations. RECON has seen several students go on to do research related to their observations in college.

        "To me this project is citizen science at its best," Buie said. "They're learning as well as making observations and helping to collect data. If they didn't do this, we wouldn't learn about these objects."

        RECON stations are commonly placed in small communities along an ideal line, from the southern to the northern border of the United States, for observation of stellar occultations. Eight additional stations were established in Canada in 2018 by colleagues of Leiva and Buie.

        Going forward, Leiva and Buie will continue to search for previously unobserved TNOs, with the aim of discovering whether close binaries are common or unusual in our Solar System.

        "Most models of the Solar System indicate that binaries are very common, particularly close binaries like this one," Leiva said. "If you have an accurate measurement of how common they are, you can fine tune these models."

        "Our overarching aim is to know how common close binary TNOs are," Buie said. "Is this object one in a million or just like 90% of them? This is fueling our knowledge for building better models of how the Solar System formed."

        Source: RIA Novosti


        Related Links
        Southwest Research Institute
        The million outer planets of a star called Sol


        Thanks for being there;
        We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

        With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

        Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

        If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.
        SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
        $5+ Billed Monthly


        paypal only
        SpaceDaily Contributor
        $5 Billed Once


        credit card or paypal


        OUTER PLANETS
        Astronomers characterize Uranian moons using new imaging analysis
        Washington DC (UPI) Sep 14, 2020
        Using new image processing techniques, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy were able to characterize the physical properties of Uranus' five moons, according to a study published Monday in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Previously, astronomers have had to rely on long-distant space missions, space probes like Voyager 1 and 2, Cassini-Huygens and New Horizons, to study the most distant moons in the the solar system. For the new study, astronomers analyzed infrared obse ... read more

        Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.



        Share this article via these popular social media networks
        del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

        OUTER PLANETS
        ISS moves to avoid space debris

        Be a Space Traffic Controller

        Aerospace Corporation dives into the future

        NASA, US Space Force establish Foundation for broad collaboration

        OUTER PLANETS
        Space Force to start flying on reused SpaceX rockets

        Powerful Delta Heavy rocket ready for another launch attempt from Florida

        Rocket Lab to launch commercial rideshares mission for Planet, Canon

        Blue Origin postpones Texas launch of experiments for NASA, universities

        OUTER PLANETS
        Could life exist deep underground on Mars

        China's Mars probe completes second orbital correction

        Perseverance will use x-rays to hunt fossils

        Study shows difficulty in finding evidence of life on Mars

        OUTER PLANETS
        NASA chief warns Congress about Chinese space station

        China's new carrier rocket available for public view

        China sends nine satellites into orbit by sea launch

        Chinese spacecraft launched mystery object into space before returning to Earth

        OUTER PLANETS
        Redcliffe Partners' Ukrainian Space Regulation Review

        SpaceX postpones Starlink launch as thick clouds persist

        Rocket policy must not be limited by capital, liability: Startups

        Intelsat entrusts Arianespace for the launch of three C-band satellites on Ariane 5 and Ariane 6

        OUTER PLANETS
        Squeezed light makes Virgo's mirrors jitter

        Radiation levels on Moon 2.6 times greater than ISS: study

        Hyperbolic metamaterials exhibit 2T physics

        Mesh reflector for shaped radio beams

        OUTER PLANETS
        Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought

        Water on exoplanet cloud tops could be found with hi-tech instrumentation

        Let them eat rocks

        Professor verifies centuries-old conjecture about the formation of the Solar System

        OUTER PLANETS
        JPL meets unique challenge, delivers radar hardware for Jupiter Mission

        Astronomers characterize Uranian moons using new imaging analysis

        Jupiter's moons could be warming each other

        Atomistic modelling probes the behavior of matter at the center of Jupiter













        The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2021 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Statement Our advertisers use various cookies and the like to deliver the best ad banner available at one time. All network advertising suppliers have GDPR policies (Legitimate Interest) that conform with EU regulations for data collection. By using our websites you consent to cookie based advertising. If you do not agree with this then you must stop using the websites from May 25, 2018. Privacy Statement. Additional information can be found here at About Us.


        一晚破了3个处